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DIY​ Dresser Turned Vanity

DIY​ Dresser Turned Vanity

A while back, I convinced my husband that our bathroom vanity was not sufficient. There was minimal counter space, a small sink and the setup was awkward. This post will show you how we went from small to shabby chic on a budget!

I honestly think the reason for this vanity upcycle, upgrade, was the fact that we couldn’t both brush our teeth or get ready and look in the mirror at the same time. Good thing I didn’t just flip the mirror for a temporary fix (but don’t tell my husband that).

Before I start gushing on more details, I need to thank my husband: he who hates Pinterest, House & Home, and Houzz  for the many ideas they supply me with. As I like to tease him about, I am the visionary and creator, and he is the maker. He tends to get frustrated as I sneak projects on the to-do list, so when he decides he wants to start a new project, I give him the “didn’t you say you were going to get this done first?” line. Let me just get this out in the open before you think I’m a task, demanding, b with an itch. My husbands projects, by any means or stretch of the imagination, are not just small vanity upcycles. They run more along the lines of “babe, I’m going to insulate, drywall, sand, mud, and paint the upstairs of the garage k?” or “This is the summer of the boats (the three sitting in our backyard, wasting away), I’m going to take them all out and get them running!”. You can imagine why when I add a small DIY to the list, I try to get him to finish it before he takes on one of his grandiose tasks. But that was a sidebar, back to the vanity.

Supplies needed:

  • Dresser that fits your space

  • Jigsaw/Reciprocating saw

  • Sink that fits your vanity

  • Faucets to accompany

  • Wood glue, finishing nails

  • Any additional plumbing for sink

  • Water resistant indoor plumbing caulking

I had seen so many beautiful upcycled dressers to vanity combo’s online, that I had something in mind. I began to scour the thrift stores, antique stores @ClassicFinds, swap and buy pages, and finally Kijiji. That summer, Brian had actually been working in Collingwood, so it opened up our options tremendously. After hours of searching, I found it! The dresser that was the right colour (I didn’t want to have to refinish it also), the perfect size, had ample storage and was the right price! It checked all the boxes! That week, Brian picked it up in Stayner at a local antique place CJ's Refinishing @MadeinStayner on his way home and we were ready to begin!

Original Dresser Purchased @CJ's Refinishing (see link above)

Original Dresser Purchased @CJ's Refinishing (see link above)

The next task we had was to find the right sink and faucet for our bathroom. In our bathroom we have a huge soaking tub with a rounded silver faucet so we were trying to find something similar. Also our bath surround tile was white, so we figured it would be best to stay away from glass sinks and stick to white. We ended up going to @Lowe’s and finding both of what we were looking for! (Click Images for direct link to Lowe's)

I wanted a nice big sink so that when we share the space, we both have room to get in there. Once we had the sink we took the measurements and used the template provided in the sink box to trace the hole it would need on the top of the vanity. After removing the drawers, Brian used a jigsaw/reciprocating saw to cut out the opening for the sink. 

Vanity Prepped and Ready

Vanity Prepped and Ready

Now, this is where my visionary brain came in and helped out even more. Brian had said that because of the depth of the sink, we would loose the two upper drawers, but this was not going to fly for me. I suggested we reshape the drawers to fit around the sink base. We could cut them and modify them (this is where Brian starts to regret doing this project) so that they would still be useable. It literally took two cuts, flipping the discarded edge around and glueing and nailing it back together to get the drawers to function. 

In the first image you see the two cuts made, we took the base out, kept the edges of the drawer and flipped them as you can see in the second image. This was just to figure out if my concept would work in reality. It did, so we did the same to the drawer in the second image, flipped the edge, glued and nailed it together.

It wasn’t until after placed the two top drawers back in that we realized we would also need to modify the second drawer as the plumbing was going to be lower than anticipated. We applied the same concept, cut and flipped the edge of the draw to make it work.

And voila! Our vanity complete.

Vanity

After a little jimmy rigging of our plumbing (it wasn’t centered on the wall), a little cursing, some lifting, the vanity was in place in our bathroom. Once the sink was in and the faucet/taps were in place, Brian used a water resistant caulking to seal around the edges to make sure there would be no leaks. In total I think we started and finished this project within 4 hours. An easy, temporary solution, to a problem of vanity haha (I enjoy my play on words).

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